When the Audience is Your Client

When speaking with a client, use what researchers call “reciprocal communication”. Try sharing a personal story that relates in some way, directly or indirectly, to your business discussion topic. Share statistics that relate to your discussion and ask the client for his or her opinion. Finding common ground removes uncomfortable barriers that restrict the free…

When the Audience is Your Co-workers

Speaking in front of co-workers comes with its own level of apprehension. No matter if it’s one co-worker or a meeting room filled with co-workers, you’ll start to worry about personal judgments when the spotlight is on you. Deflect attention away from yourself with a PowerPoint slide, diagram or handout to help you focus on…

When the Audience is Your Boss

Speaking to someone in authority naturally generates a certain amount of anxiety. Fight off what psychologists call “anticipatory anxiety” (imagining all the things that could go wrong) by knowing exactly what you want to say. Practice your speech, for any audience, even the boss. You do not need to memorize it line by line but…

Are You Promotable?

A survey of CEOs and HR executives revealed that the three most important elements they consider when hiring or promoting are (in ranked order): Communications skills Professional image Qualifications When is the last time you worked on your communications skills and professional image? Put yourself at the top of the list by attending Dardis Communications’…