20-Minute Chunks

Research shows that people learn and retain more information from presentations that are 20 minutes long or delivered in 20-minute segments. For longer presentations, consider changing activities or providing short breaks every 20 minutes. Your audience will get more out of it.  Inspired by Susan M. Weinschenk’s 100 Things Every Presenter Needs to Know About…

Want Them to Remember? Repeat it or Connect it.

These are the two ways to get people to move information from their short-term memory to their long-term memory. During your presentation, repeat your key message several times or connect your message to something they already know through stories and comparisons.  Inspired by Susan M. Weinschenk’s 100 Things Every Presenter Needs to Know About People…

Use Improv to Discover Possibilities

The three rules of improvisational theater are: 1) hear offers, 2) say “yes and” and 3) make your partner look good. Consider applying these simple rules in your daily interactions with coworkers and prospects. Listen, really listen, to what they are saying to hear others’ perspectives. Saying “yes and” leads to more positive opportunities than…

What’s Your Why?

Why questions are the most compelling questions you can ask yourself and others. Why are you doing what you’re doing? Your “why” transcends your career choices and to do list. It reveals how you see yourself and your greater purpose. My “why” is simply helping people build their self-confidence. What’s your why? (Inspired by Whiney…

Promote Your Potential

When you’re in a position to “sell” yourself, focus on more than your education, experience and achievements. Emphasize the promise of what you could accomplish. Researchers found that people often find potential more interesting than accomplishment. So how would you describe your potential? Inspired by Daniel H. Pink’s To Sell is Human

Two First Impressions

When we meet someone for the first time, we’re actually making two first impressions: trustworthiness and confidence. People we meet ask themselves, “What are this person’s intentions toward me?” and “How strong and competent is this person?” Research shows that those two factors make up 90% of an overall first impression. What are you doing…